Good vs bad driver behavior can mean a 25% variance on whole life cycle costs


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Influencing a culture of good driver behaviour is essential for all fleet managers – the difference in whole life cycle costs between a fleet of good drivers compared to a fleet of bad drivers can be 25%. Data collected from Chevin’s customer base shows that the best drivers can reduce costs by more than 12%, but the worst drivers can increase costs by more than 13%.

An accident can be 36 times the cost of a basic repair, so ensuring you have a strategy to reduce the risk of accidents within your fleet must be a priority for all fleet managers.

Increased Cost & Accident Risk

Good drivers not only save money, they are also a lot safer behind the wheel. According to The Road Safety Commission, NetSafeUtah.org and VeryWell.com:

A driver with a blood alcohol level of 0.08% is 7 times more likely to be involved in a fatal motor vehicle crash
A driver with a blood alcohol level of 0.15% is 25 times more likely to be involved in a fatal motor vehicle crash
A driver is 6 times more likely to get into an accident when eating while driving
A driver is 4 times more likely to get into an accident when talking on a cell phone while driving
A driver is 24 times more likely to get into an accident when texting on a cell phone while driving


Tips to becoming a good driver

Slow down:

 Speeding accounted for approximately 46% of all fatal crashes on the road in Australia in 2015
Reducing your speed can be the difference between life and death: a person struck by a vehicle at 30 km/h will be injured, but is likely to survive, however a person who is struck by a vehicle travelling at 50 km/h is much more likely to be killed
Increasing your speed from 70 km/h to 80 km/h increases the risk of crashing by 60%

 

Avoid Distractions:

Keep your eyes on the road, hands on the wheel and mind focused on driving
22% of all car accidents involved a distracted driver in 2015
71% of all truck accidents involved a distracted driver in 2015

 

Don’t drink & drive, and get plenty of rest:

Of all fatally injured drivers who were tested in 2015:

14% were alcohol-related
19% were fatigued

 

Always wear a seat belt:

Drivers and passengers are around 8 times more likely to be killed in a road crash if they are not wearing a seatbelt
Road users most guilty of not wearing a seatbelt are men aged below 40
Remember, the driver is responsible for the proper restraint of all passengers

Infographic

good driver vs bad driver behaviour infographic